Day 4&5 Chemotherapy

So apart from comprising Boxing Day, the last two days have been fairly similar with regards to my treatment. After the usual blood tests and pre-meds there hasn’t been a huge amount to report:

The chemicals:

each day at about 10:00am I am hooked up to a bag of cyclophosphamide which lasts about an hour. I read today that it leads to a high risk of infertility. Noting that this is the most common treatment in my regime, I’m glad I was able to bank some of my potential self on Monday!

How do I feel?

Yesterday, I felt a little uncomfortable after the treatment. I felt a little short of breath and light headed. I’ve experienced this before, and noting that I’m basically being poisoned, I expect to feel a little strange. Nevertheless, I mentioned it to the nurse. They were less concerned, but as a precaution performed some additional blood tests (to check for heart function) and hooked me up to an ECG machine (which I know from watching Holby City means Echo Cardiogram!) it was a little strange having sticky patches (about 8 in total) stuck all over my body, and cables linked up to a machine which ultimately produced an old style dot matrix print out! (Presumably of my heart rhythm). All was well though.

Each nurse and doctor I’ve spoken to, has reiterated the importance of drinking plenty of fluids. I appear to have fairly low blood pressure which they seem to attribute to me not drinking. As a middle distance runner, I’m fairly used to drinking water and I think with the ‘sloppy diet’ that I’m struggling through, I’m pretty confident of my hydration level.

This was further enforced when I was asked to sample 24hrs Urine for testing- I was given a jug and a 5 litre bottle, the nurse said I was unlikely to fill it, but to ask if I needed more!

24hrs Urine
24hrs Urine

After a good night’s sleep (with the aid of a tablet) I felt refreshed this morning. Although after having my shower, I felt really weak. Perhaps I’m a competitive bloke who doesn’t like loss of control, but having been pretty fit and healthy a couple of months ago and now being too weak to climb a flight of stairs without breaking a sweat is a little difficult to swallow.

On top of this, with annoying acid reflux aside, I think I’m starting to experience my first real symptom of treatment. Until now, although the food I’ve been eating has been strange and at times revolting to look at in a puréed form, it’s familiar and at times comforting taste has generally aided consumption. Now everything seems to have a kind of metallic taste, and without my sense of smell it’s difficult to distinguish from a cup of tea, a glass of water or the hideous ‘natural’ flavoured mouthwash I have to rinse with 3 times a day!

Some good news, however, I get a 2 day break from treatment and as my Haemoglobin levels seem to have restored slightly, I’ve been told that I can return to the comfort of my home until Monday when I’m due to start a 23hour course of Methotrexate (for which I as yet don’t have any information, I’m lead to believe is unlikely to be an enjoyable experience)

Day 2&3 Chemotherapy

So Merry Christmas! I’m feeling in as much the spirit as is reasonably possible. I’m wearing teal striped PJ’s which my mum said looked a bit like the ones the boy in ‘The Snowman’ was wearing, and my socks have baubles on!

Xmas PJ's
Xmas PJ’s

Yesterday was pretty tough going but not anywhere near as difficult as I thought; I was due to have an intrathecal injection (through the spinal column) but that has been delayed due to shortage of staff.

Here’s the low down of my chemotherapy treatment over the last 48 hours:

The chemicals day 2 (Christmas Eve):

Each morning at about 6:30 the nurse wakes me up to take blood samples before breakfast, they also check my blood pressure, temperature and heart rate to make sure I’ve had no effects during the night (these “obs'” are performed regularly throughout the day. I went through the usual round of intravenous flushes and bladder protecting compounds (along with anti sickness tablets and others that I’m losing track of)

Rituximab

This chemical is from a group of chemicals called ‘monoclonal antibodies’ which can accurately pinpoint specific cells via proteins. In this case, as my cancer is related to ‘B-lymphocytes’ which have a protein spot called CD20, the manufactured antibodies attach to this compound so that my body can break down and destroy these cells. The downside, is that at the same time, they attack good cells (which my body will eventually replenish) this can lead to certain side effects.

Although this is a very effective treatment, it can lead to allergic reactions such as itchy rash and sickness. I was also given an antihistamine to reduce this risk. During infusion, the nurses start the drip very slowly and take observations at 30 minute intervals to check how I’m coping. If all is well, they notch up to the next flow rate and so on. To start with I felt fine, but after about the 3rd hour, I started getting short breath, light headedness and my blood pressure had dropped slightly so they continued at this rate for a while. I also experienced some severe stomach cramps which I’m told could be due to the growth receding and my bowels moving around.

The drip lasted for about 7 hours, and by the end all I was feeling was a little light headed and lethargic.

Cyclophosphamide

Finally I was given a bag of cyclophosphamide, this is one of the main chemicals used in my treatment and most of the days of my schedule I will be having this.

This drip lasted for an hour and at the end I was starting to feel quite tired. I watched Skyfall on ITV and then was given a sleeping tablet to help me drop off!

Day 3 – Christmas Day

Today the schedule is thankfully a little more relaxed, I’ve had the usual pre-meds and tests, and I am due to have another round of cyclophosphamide in a moment. This should last for about an hour.

I’m still a little tired this morning and felt a little dizzy coming out of the shower but I feel much less pressure around my abdomen. I opened my bowels this morning too which as ridiculous and disgusting as it may sound, was probably the most comfortable passing I’ve had for weeks. I will regard this as the first Christmas present of the day!

I was left with a stocking of gifts by my mum and have just received a present from the nurses on the ward which is gratefully appreciated. I am also looking forward to seeing my family this afternoon to exchange gifts (I had a bit of a logistical nightmare getting people to buy, collect and wrap presents for each other on my behalf, but I think I managed to pull it off!)

anyway, that’s me for today- wishing everyone a merry Christmas.